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“In this passage we have a rule set down for how we are to conduct ourselves before kings. Solomon’s words here bear a striking resemblance to the those of Paul in the beginning of the 13th chapter of Romans. ‘Let every soul be subject to the governing authorities. For there is no authority except from God, and the authorities that exist are appointed by God. Therefore whoever resists the authority resists the ordinance of God, and those who resist will bring judgment on themselves. For rulers are not a terror to good works, but to evil. Do you want to be unafraid of the authority? Do what is good, and you will have praise of the same. For he is God’s minister to you for good. But if you do evil, be afraid; for he does not bear the sword in vain; for he is God’s minister, an avenger to execute wrath on him who practices evil. Therefore you must be subject, not only because of wrath but also for conscience’s sake’ (Rom. 13:1-5)

Solomon’s reference to the ‘oath of God,’ like Paul’s affirmation that the governing authority is ‘God’s minister,’ indicates that the king’s authority is merely a reflection of the Kingly authority of the Lord. We are to offer all due subjection to the king because he is God’s minister, and our actions toward him mirror our subjection to God.

By analogy, then, the principles stated here apply even more forcefully to our conduct as subjects of the King of kings. If we are to keep the king’s commandments, for the sake of the oath of God, and conduct ourselves in the royal court with reverent fear, how much more must we obey God’s laws and order our conduct in His holy courts according to what He requires? If we are not to be hasty is [in] going out of the king’s presence, how much more should we love to tarry in the courts of the Lord? If we are not to persist in an evil opinion or practice in the king’s presence, how much more should we be ready to forsake every vain opinion before Him who ‘does whatever He pleases in heaven and in earth, in the seas and all the deep places’ (Ps. 135:6). If there is power where the word of a king is, how much more is power to be found in the Word of the Lord.

Three reasons are given for the subjection here required. First, we must be subject for conscience sake- because of ‘the oath of God,’ by which we are bound in covenant to serve Him as His creatures. Second, we must be subject for wrath’s sake- because His commands are enforced by His power and judgment. Third, we must be subject for the sake of our own comfort-for he who keeps His command will experience nothing harmful.

Thus, conscience toward God, reverent fear, and a due regard for the well-being that He promises to those who walk obediently will induce us to yield to His authority when we stand before His presence.” (Comin, 207-208)

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